readingsexy-vampkiss

Found list

So, accidentally posting a request for a list before I looked here, and found it here easily. On the other hand, the journal looks pretty sad — I'm thinking it's either because I rarely update it anymore, or because it's a free account and there maybe isn't such a thing anymore? I dunno. 

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POV article

From a similar source to the first one (which still hasn't asked me for money or cut me off), this is a good article on point of view — what the different ones are, pros and cons of using a given pov, and some examples. <a href="https://www.nownovel.com/blog/different-points-of-view-tips">find it here</a>

(Full confession, no less a writer than Ursula Le Guinn is a fan of omniscient involved narrators, so rather than rewrite everything I've ever written where I jump between pov, I think I can fix the ones that really bother me without doing anything that extreme. And I may do so, at least on my own laptop copies of the stories. Will I repost and/or edit the ones already archived? Probably not. But fixing them will be a great writing exercise for me and we all know how much the teacher in me loves finding things to use that way.)

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While we can get it...

So, I looked at something somewhere that was writing advice (may have posted a link here last week, I don't remember) and it seems that got me on a mailing list of some sort. The site or business is for those who are or want to be professional writers, and I would guess at some point they will want money for something or will insist I "join" the group. But, meanwhile, they are sending me links to some useful stuff. Which I'm sharing, cause, you know, useful stuff!

I'm not usually a big fan of writing advice because it's a creative art and really has no room for things like "never do this" or "always do that", but these two articles seem surprisingly free of that kind of insistence on following a pattern, so I think they are worth reading and considering.  

If you are a complete newbie, very young, very unsure of yourself, or have received hurtful, unsolicited "con crit" (ouch!)  these could provide some excellent guidelines, and I will continue to link to the ones I think are worth reading. If you've been writing for years and know you have admirers, and you are comfortable and satisfied with your own style, then the articles are still worth reading, but with an experienced eye toward your own successful comfort level.



And for anyone who betas or edits for someone else, it's a good look at some things to keep in mind while working on another writer's work. 

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Resources

There is now a Facebook group for Elysian Fields discussions that has some wonderful conversations, as well as a growing list of resources for writers that includes links to Victorian facts of life, some punctuation/grammar sites, fighting scenes, and lots of other places to research something you may want to use in your own writing.  This link to that thread may or may not work, but if it doesn't, you can look for the thread on your own.  If/when I have time, I may try to copy all the links and put them up here, but don't hold your breath waiting for it!

<a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/388853654965315/permalink/438928539957826/?comment_id=444001036117243&notif_id=1532863867122837&notif_t=group_comment_follow">here</a>

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Point of view

Who? Why? What can he/she see or know? This is a good article on pov — the various versions of it and some discussions of how to make first-person pov work. You can find it . <a href="https://thewritepractice.com/...ords/">Here</a>

My plan is to try to make this community a little more active again by posting other writing-related links, as well as updating some of the old entries. There are words to add to the homonym list, I just have to remember what they are or add them as I come across them somewhere. 

So, if anyone is still hanging around or checking occasionally, feel free to add your own contributions or begin a discussion about something you'd like to talk about. And if you're new here, I hope you find something helpful. We are oriented toward the technical aspects of writing (grammar, punctuation, word usage — my thing, sentence structure) but have no rules against discussing more subjective issues like genres, tropes, and so on. Just try to keep it constructive and/or if it's opinion, be sure to state that it is only your opinion or preference.


PS: looks like LJ has changed the way I do links. I'll have to figure out what that is, but it looks like this one will work, it just is showing its parts.



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New stuff!

Yay? LOL Below is a link to an entry on AO3 that provides a list of commonly-used terms that are different in the US and UK. Should be helpful for writers on either side of the pond (British term - see what I did there?). Even if you just glance down it, you may see something that surprises you and you'll know to go back and check if you're in doubt. I only had one quibble, which was the word "heels" for shoes with, you know, high heels. I've never used the word "pump" in my life, although I am quite aware that it is the official term for dress shoes with a heel of any height, but I also don't bother to say "high heels". Just "heels" has worked fine for me my entire life, without any influence from abroad. :) No doubt you will find your own personal issues with it, but I believe it is pretty comprehensive and worth taking a look at.



http://archiveofourown.org/works/6010708?show_comments=true&view_full_work=false#comment_153530217

Even better, IMHO, would be a list of different phrases that skew heavily American or heavily British. (Xander saying he's just going to "pop round to the..." would be an example of what I mean by phrases that skew British. I'm sure my British friends can find just as many examples of things Giles has said in fics that make them roll their eyes. I may find myself working on something like this for RRU with assistance from my British friends who can provide a list of phrases Americans get wrong.

There are so many things to consider when writing someone else's characters and their dialogue. In addition to the words and phrases that make up an "accent", there is the cadence of the character's speech, his/her level of education and attention to proper grammar, and even the way the character structures their sentences. Interesting side note: I find that I can sometimes tell how an author feels about a particular character by the words they put into the character's mouth....
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submissions

So, here's a new wrinkle - LJ asked me to approve or disapprove the latest post in the community. It was not originally set up as a moderated community, so I don't know what that's all about, but shouldn't be a big deal since they send me a notification when it happens. But just in case anyone posts something and you get told it has to be approved, that's apparently the case now. Perhaps it's an attempt to keep spam away or something. Anyway, I'll be checking regularly, so no worries.